Our scientists and doctors are involved in fertility research and development to make treatment more effective and safe. 

This work is across our clinics in Malaysia and New Zealand, as well as collaborative work with other clinics overseas to ensure we continue to deliver world-class care. Our fertility research ranges from ‘blue sky’ science to very practical projects with immediate benefits. 

Our major research partner in New Zealand is the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at the University of Auckland. We also work with the Liggins Institute and the Department of Psychology at the University of Auckland, and the School of Biological Sciences at Victoria University.

Areas of research over the past decade
  • Can we measure DNA in culture media as an alternative to embryo biopsy to screen for chromosome abnormalities?
  • Can we improve the prediction of time lapse photography of embryos by looking at gene expression of the eggs supporting cells?
  • What do mitochondria in eggs and their supporting cells tell us about the aging of eggs?
  • How does temperature change in embryo culture dishes and during embryo handing in the IVF lab? Work by Dr Sophie Blomfield as part of her PhD thesis in association with the Department of Bioprocess Engineering, Massey University.
  • Continuous improvement in IVF clinics under the RTAC accreditation system
  • Falling sperm quality in NZ men over 25 years
  • Lifestyle changes people make before IVF treatment – do they make sense?
  • Growth and metabolism of children conceived after IVF, frozen embryos and ovulation induction. Several papers with the Liggins Institute.
  • Why do patients give up on IVF treatment?
Publications in medical and scientific journals
  • Is the Blastomere Symmetry at the 4-cell Stage Related to Ploidy? (Tain D, Ng BL, Lim M, Chen JJ, Sinthamoney E, Wong PS).  Read here.
  • The impact of human embryo fragmentation on blastocyst development and ploidy using Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS). (JH Tan, JJ Chen, LJ Lim, PS Wong) Read here. 
  • Recombinant versus Urinary Gonadotrophins: A pilot study to evaluate ploidy status of embryos derived from IVF. (D.L. Leong*, J. J. Chen, P. S. Wong). Read here. 
  • The Impact of Embryo Morphokinetics on Ploidy and Implantation Rates. (Lim YY, Chen JJ, Devi S, Wong PS). Read here. 
  • Live birth after transfer of a vitrified-warmed euploid blastocyst derived from the vitrified-warmed oocyte and frozen-thawed testicular sperm: A case report. (Kit A, Sinthamoney E, Wong PS). Read here. 
  • The relationship between chromosomal mosaicism and maternal age in embryos screened with Next Generation Sequencing (NGS). (MH Yeoh, JJ Chen, E Sinthamoney, PS Wong). Read here. 
  • Pregnancy following thalassemia screening using a combined Preimplantation Genetic Testing for monogenic defect and aneuploidy: Two case reports. (J.J. Chen, E. Sinthamoney, P.S. Wong). Read here. 
  • Is the Blastomere Symmetry at the 4-cell Stage Related to Ploidy? – A Pilot Study. (Tain D, Ng BL, Lim M, Chen JJ, Sinthamoney E, Wong PS). Read here. 
  • Is cleavage rate indicative of the outcome of blastocyst transfer? A retrospective analysis. (Kausalyah BS, Ng BL, Sinthamoney E, Wong PS). Read here. 
  • Cleavage stage embryo KIDScore as a predictor of blastocyst formation and ploidy. (Kausalyah BS, J.J. Chen, D. Morbeck, Y.Y. Lim, M.H Yeoh, J.H. Tan and, Sinthamoney E). Read here. 
  • The impact of human embryo fragmentation on blastocyst development and ploidy using Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS). (JH Tan, JJ Chen, LJ Lim, PS Wong). Read here. 
  • Predicting the likelihood of embryo transfer following Pre-implantation Genetic Testing for Aneuploidy (PGT-A). (Tan JH, Lim SR, Ng BL, Chen JJ, Sinthamoney E, Wong PS). Read here. 
  • Better fresh than frozen? Frozen-thawed surgical sperm retrieval (SSR) sperm yield similar fertilization, embryo use, and pregnancy rates compared to fresh SSR sperm. (Song SHY, Chen JJ, Lim LJ, Morbeck DE). Read here. 
  • Is cleavage rate indicative of the outcome of blastocyst transfer A retrospective analysis. (Kausalyah BS, Ng BL, Sinthamoney E, Wong PS). Read here.